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Saint Vincent Infirmary Medical Center
Saint Vincent Infirmary Medical Center
Saint Vincent Infirmary Medical Center
Location : 2 Saint Vincent Cir,Little Rock
AR 72205
Website
:
stvincenthealth.com
About Hospital

St. Vincent has embodied a spirit of charity, love of the poor, and a sincere desire to end suffering from its inception as "The Charity Hospital" in 1888 to the current era of managed care and rapid change in health care.

St. Vincent owes its existence to an epidemic that did not occur. In 1878 yellow fever was ravaging the South and was as near a Memphis. It seemed only a matter of weeks, maybe days, before the fever would strike Little Rock, which had few physicians and no hospital service at that time. Many, including Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hager, believed only an act of God would stop the plague. The Hagers, two of the city's wealthier residents, vowed to God that if Little Rock was spared they would, in gratitude, provide the funds to build a hospital. Miraculously, the yellow fever outbreak did not affect Little Rock and the Hagers kept their vow.

In 1888 Mother General Cleophas, leader of the religious community, with five Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, Kentucky, arrived at the Little Rock train station on the slow moving Iron Mountain Railroad. Sisters Mary James, Cornelia, Mechtildes, Mary Sebastian, and Hortense were invited to Little Rock by the Most Rev. Edward Fitzgerald, Bishop of the Little Rock Diocese. A 10-bed Charity Hospital was founded on East Second Street by the Hagers' estate and with the support of Little Rock financier Edward Parker and others. It was the first hospital outside the boundaries of Kentucky which the Sisters of Charity would operate.

The Arkansas Gazette reported that seven physicians were involved in the initial planning of the hospital - R. B. Christian, R. G. Jennings, J. A. Dibrell, Edwin Bentley, William E. Green, Claiborne Watkins, and E. D. Avers.

"The people of this City have taken a just pride… Contributions of ice, meat, furniture, groceries and clothing have been quite liberal in the past and will no doubt continue in the future. Owing to the general appreciation of the public, immediate steps are being taken to enlarge the capacity of the buildings." - Arkansas Gazette, March 1889.

In 1889 Bishop Fitzgerald changed the name of the hospital from Charity Hospital to the Little Rock Infirmary. The original desire of Bishop Fitzgerald and the Sisters of Charity was to name the hospital St. Vincent Infirmary in honor of St. Vincent de Paul, a French priest who compassionately cared for the sick and the poor.

As the 20th Century began and America entered its age of technology, the hospital, now called St. Vincent Infirmary, moved from its second location on Center Street to a three-story, 50-bed hospital at 10th and High Streets. In addition to being necessary to meet the growing demand for patient care, the move was a major step toward eliminating the stereotype of hospitals being only the last resort for the sick and dying.

The Sisters wrote, "After many tribulations, we took possession in September 1900. We moved all the furniture… and 36 railroad patients."

The expansion provided the space for the long-awaited St. Vincent Infirmary School of Nursing, which opened in 1906 as Arkansas' first nursing school. The first class, seven students, graduated in 1909. Until then, the Sisters served at St. Vincent as the only nurses. The school of nursing, which operated for 63 years until 1969, graduating 1,431 nurses was re-established in 2001 as the School of Practical Nursing (LPN).

Fifty beds were only sufficient until 1910 when a 100-bed annex was added to the Infirmary.

In March of 1920, St. Vincent became one of the first 12 hospitals in the United States to install X-ray apparatus and the Department of Roentgenology was formed. The fledgling department was the ancestor of the Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Departments of the late 1970s and paved the way for such current advances as Vertebroplasty, R2 Image Checker, and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Fusion.

In 1920 the Medical Staff at St. Vincent - which had grown to 16 physicians - was officially organized in accordance with the American College of Surgeons. The medical staff would grow to about 140 active staff by 1954 and to approximately 865 active, senior active and associate staff members by 2002. Also, in 1920, St. Vincent became the first hospital in the state to be certified by the American College of Surgeons. Years later, this organization developed into the healthcare accreditation organization now known as The Joint Commission.

In 1938 the Sisters celebrated their Golden Jubilee (50th anniversary) in Little Rock by opening a maternity annex. Thousands of babies were born at the 10th and High Street location. The 60-bed maternity wing would also become the foundation for the state's first Intensive Care Nursery in 1972. St. Vincent would enter a 16 year hiatus before resuming obstetrics in 1992.

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Saint Vincent Infirmary Medical Center
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Saint Vincent Infirmary Medical Center

Saint Vincent Infirmary Medical Center

Saint Vincent Infirmary Medical Center
Saint Vincent Infirmary Medical Center
Location : 2 Saint Vincent Cir,Little Rock
AR 72205
Website :
stvincenthealth.com
Rating: 0 (0 Ratings)
About Hospital

St. Vincent has embodied a spirit of charity, love of the poor, and a sincere desire to end suffering from its inception as "The Charity Hospital" in 1888 to the current era of managed care and rapid change in health care.

St. Vincent owes its existence to an epidemic that did not occur. In 1878 yellow fever was ravaging the South and was as near a Memphis. It seemed only a matter of weeks, maybe days, before the fever would strike Little Rock, which had few physicians and no hospital service at that time. Many, including Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hager, believed only an act of God would stop the plague. The Hagers, two of the city's wealthier residents, vowed to God that if Little Rock was spared they would, in gratitude, provide the funds to build a hospital. Miraculously, the yellow fever outbreak did not affect Little Rock and the Hagers kept their vow.

In 1888 Mother General Cleophas, leader of the religious community, with five Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, Kentucky, arrived at the Little Rock train station on the slow moving Iron Mountain Railroad. Sisters Mary James, Cornelia, Mechtildes, Mary Sebastian, and Hortense were invited to Little Rock by the Most Rev. Edward Fitzgerald, Bishop of the Little Rock Diocese. A 10-bed Charity Hospital was founded on East Second Street by the Hagers' estate and with the support of Little Rock financier Edward Parker and others. It was the first hospital outside the boundaries of Kentucky which the Sisters of Charity would operate.

The Arkansas Gazette reported that seven physicians were involved in the initial planning of the hospital - R. B. Christian, R. G. Jennings, J. A. Dibrell, Edwin Bentley, William E. Green, Claiborne Watkins, and E. D. Avers.

"The people of this City have taken a just pride… Contributions of ice, meat, furniture, groceries and clothing have been quite liberal in the past and will no doubt continue in the future. Owing to the general appreciation of the public, immediate steps are being taken to enlarge the capacity of the buildings." - Arkansas Gazette, March 1889.

In 1889 Bishop Fitzgerald changed the name of the hospital from Charity Hospital to the Little Rock Infirmary. The original desire of Bishop Fitzgerald and the Sisters of Charity was to name the hospital St. Vincent Infirmary in honor of St. Vincent de Paul, a French priest who compassionately cared for the sick and the poor.

As the 20th Century began and America entered its age of technology, the hospital, now called St. Vincent Infirmary, moved from its second location on Center Street to a three-story, 50-bed hospital at 10th and High Streets. In addition to being necessary to meet the growing demand for patient care, the move was a major step toward eliminating the stereotype of hospitals being only the last resort for the sick and dying.

The Sisters wrote, "After many tribulations, we took possession in September 1900. We moved all the furniture… and 36 railroad patients."

The expansion provided the space for the long-awaited St. Vincent Infirmary School of Nursing, which opened in 1906 as Arkansas' first nursing school. The first class, seven students, graduated in 1909. Until then, the Sisters served at St. Vincent as the only nurses. The school of nursing, which operated for 63 years until 1969, graduating 1,431 nurses was re-established in 2001 as the School of Practical Nursing (LPN).

Fifty beds were only sufficient until 1910 when a 100-bed annex was added to the Infirmary.

In March of 1920, St. Vincent became one of the first 12 hospitals in the United States to install X-ray apparatus and the Department of Roentgenology was formed. The fledgling department was the ancestor of the Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Departments of the late 1970s and paved the way for such current advances as Vertebroplasty, R2 Image Checker, and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Fusion.

In 1920 the Medical Staff at St. Vincent - which had grown to 16 physicians - was officially organized in accordance with the American College of Surgeons. The medical staff would grow to about 140 active staff by 1954 and to approximately 865 active, senior active and associate staff members by 2002. Also, in 1920, St. Vincent became the first hospital in the state to be certified by the American College of Surgeons. Years later, this organization developed into the healthcare accreditation organization now known as The Joint Commission.

In 1938 the Sisters celebrated their Golden Jubilee (50th anniversary) in Little Rock by opening a maternity annex. Thousands of babies were born at the 10th and High Street location. The 60-bed maternity wing would also become the foundation for the state's first Intensive Care Nursery in 1972. St. Vincent would enter a 16 year hiatus before resuming obstetrics in 1992.

Hospital Type :
Saint Vincent Infirmary Medical Center
Specialties :
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