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New Volkswagen Automobiles

Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
170hp @ 4,800RPM
Top speed
:
5
Carbody
:
Hatchback
$19,495
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
200hp @ 5,100RPM
Top speed
:
6
Carbody
:
Not Available
$32,995
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
115hp @ RPM
Top speed
:
1
Carbody
:
Hatchback
$33,450
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
200hp @ 5,100RPM
Top speed
:
6
Carbody
:
Convertible
$36,145
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
170hp @ 4,500RPM
Top speed
:
5
Carbody
:
Wagon
$17,995
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
210hp @ 4,500RPM
Top speed
:
6
Carbody
:
Hatchback
$24,785
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
292hp @ 5,400RPM
Top speed
:
6
Carbody
:
Hatchback
$36,595
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
170hp @ 4,500RPM
Top speed
:
5
Carbody
:
Wagon
$21,395
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
115hp @ 5,200RPM
Top speed
:
5
Carbody
:
Sedan
$16,215
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
150hp @ 5,000RPM
Top speed
:
7
Carbody
:
Sedan
$31,120
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
170hp @ 4,800RPM
Top speed
:
5
Carbody
:
Not Available
$21,340
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
200hp @ 5,100RPM
Top speed
:
6
Carbody
:
Not Available
$26,255
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
280hp @ 6,200RPM
Top speed
:
8
Carbody
:
Not Available
$44,705
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
333hp @ 5,500RPM
Top speed
:
8
Carbody
:
Not Available
$66,995
0/0
Release Date
:
2014
Max power
:
55 Kw (75 Hp)
Top speed
:
173 km/h
Carbody
:
Hatchback
€ 16.090 €
0/0
Release Date
:
2014
Max power
:
81 Kw (110 Hp)
Top speed
:
196 km/h
Carbody
:
Hatchback
€ 20.130 €
0/0
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About Volkswagen

Volkswagen

History

1937–45: People's Car project becomes Kbelwagen

Volkswagen was originally founded in 1937 by the German Labour Front (Deutsche Arbeitsfront). In the early 1930s, the German auto industry was still largely composed of luxury models, and the average German could rarely afford anything more than a motorcycle. As a result, only one German out of 50 owned a car. Seeking a potential new market, some car makers began independent "peoples' car" projects – Mercedes' 170H, Adler's AutoBahn, Steyr 55, Hanomag 1,3L, among others.

The trend was not new, as Bla Barnyi is credited with having conceived the basic design in the middle 1920s. Josef Ganz developed the Standard Superior (going as far as advertising it as the "German Volkswagen"). In Germany the company Hanomag mass-produced the 2/10 PS "Komissbrot", a small, cheap rear engined car, from 1925 to 1928.[4] Also, in Czechoslovakia, the Hans Ledwinka's penned Tatra T77, a very popular car amongst the German elite, was becoming smaller and more affordable at each revision. Ferdinand Porsche, a well known designer for high end vehicles and race cars, had been trying for years to get a manufacturer interested in a small car suitable for a family. He felt the small cars at the time were just stripped down big cars. Instead he built a car he called the "Volksauto" from the ground up in 1931, using many of the ideas floating around at the time and several of his own, putting together a car with an air-cooled rear engine, torsion bar suspension, and a "beetle" shape, the front hood rounded for better aerodynamics (necessary as it had a small engine).

In 1933, with many of the above projects still in development or early stages of production, Adolf Hitler got involved, demanding the production of a basic vehicle capable of transporting two adults and three children at 100 km/h (62 mph). He wanted his German citizens to have the same access to a car as the Americans. The "People's Car" would be available to citizens of the Third Reich through a savings plan at 990 Reichsmark (US$396 in 1930s dollars)—about the price of a small motorcycle (the average income being around 32RM a week).

Despite heavy lobbying in favour of one of the existing projects, it soon became apparent that private industry could not turn out a car for only 990RM. Thus, Hitler chose to sponsor an all-new, state-owned factory using Ferdinand Porsche's design (with some of Hitler's design constraints, including an air-cooled engine so nothing could freeze). The intention was that ordinary Germans would buy the car by means of a savings scheme ("Fnf Mark die Woche musst du sparen, willst du im eigenen Wagen fahren" – "Five marks a week you must put aside, if you want in your own car to ride"), which around 336,000 people eventually paid into. The savings of these 336,000 people were seized by the Russians in 1945 when they captured Berlin. However, the entire project was financially unsound, and only the corruption and lack of accountability of the Nazi regime made it possible.[Note 1]

Prototypes of the car called the "KdF-Wagen" (German: Kraft durch Freude – "strength through joy"), appeared from 1936 onwards (the first cars had been produced in Stuttgart). The car already had its distinctive round shape and air-cooled, flat-four, rear-mounted engine. The VW car was just one of many KdF programs which included things such as tours and outings. The prefix Volks— ("People's") was not just applied to cars, but also to other products in Germany; the "Volksempfnger" radio receiver for instance. On 28 May 1937, the Gesellschaft zur Vorbereitung des Deutschen Volkswagens mbH (sometimes abbreviated to Gezuvor) was established by the Deutsche Arbeitsfront. It was later renamed "Volkswagenwerk GmbH" on 16 September 1938.

1945-1948: British Army, Major Ivan Hirst, unclear future
The company owes its post-war existence largely to one man, British Army officer Major Ivan Hirst, REME. In April 1945, KdF-Stadt, and its heavily bombed factory were captured by the Americans, and subsequently handed over to the British, within whose occupation zone the town and factory fell. The factories were placed under the control of Oldham-born Hirst. At first, the plan was to use it for military vehicle maintenance, and possibly dismantled and shipped to Britain. Since it had been used for military production, and had been in Hirst's words a "political animal" rather than a commercial enterprise—technically making it liable for destruction under the terms of the Potsdam Agreement—the equipment was in time intended to be salvaged as war reparations. (Allied dismantling policy changed in late 1946 to mid-1947, although heavy industry continued to be dismantled until 1951.) Hirst painted one of the factory's cars green and demonstrated it to British Army headquarters. Short of light transport, in September 1945 the British Army was persuaded to place a vital order for 20,000. The first few hundred cars went to personnel from the occupying forces, and to the German Post Office.

Some British Service personnel were allowed to take their VW Beetles back to the United Kingdom when they were demobilised, and one of the very first Beetles brought back in that way (UK registration number JLT 420) is still owned by Peter Colborne-Baber, the son of the original proprietor of the UK's first official Volkswagen Importer, Colborne Garages of Ripley, Surrey.

1974: From Beetle to Golf
Volkswagen was in serious trouble by 1973. The Type 3 and Type 4 models had sold in much smaller numbers than the Beetle and the NSU-based K70 also failed to woo buyers. Beetle sales had started to decline rapidly in European and North American markets. The company knew that Beetle production had to end one day, but the conundrum of replacing it had been a never-ending nightmare. VW's ownership of Audi / Auto Union proved to be the key to the solution – with its expertise in front-wheel drive, and water-cooled engines which Volkswagen so desperately needed to produce a credible Beetle successor. Audi influences paved the way for this new generation of Volkswagens, known as the Passat, Scirocco, Golf and Polo.

First in the series was the Volkswagen Passat (Dasher in the U.S.), introduced in 1973, a fastback version of the Audi 80, using many identical body and mechanical parts. Estate/wagon versions were available in many markets. In Europe, the estate/wagon version dominated in market share for many years.

In spring 1974, the Scirocco followed. The coupe was designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro. Based on the platform of the not yet released Golf, it was built at Karmann due to capacity constraints at Volkswagen.

The pivotal model emerged as the Volkswagen Golf in 1974, marketed in the United States and Canada as the Rabbit for the 1st generation (1975–1985) and 5th generation (2006–2009). Its angular styling was designed by the Italian Giorgetto Giugiaro). Its design followed trends for small family cars set by the 1959 Mini – the Golf had a transversely mounted, water-cooled engine in the front, driving the front wheels, and had a hatchback, a format that has dominated the market segment ever since. Beetle production at Wolfsburg ended upon the Golf's introduction. It continued in smaller numbers at other German factories (Hanover and Emden) until 1978, but mainstream production shifted to Brazil and Mexico.

Awards
World Car of the Year
Volkswagen have produced four winners of the World Car of the Year competition. Volkswagen has the most World Car of the Year awards of any automaker.

  • 2009 - Volkswagen Golf
  • 2010 - Volkswagen Polo
  • 2012 - Volkswagen up!
  • 2013 - Volkswagen Golf

Volkswagen has had one car shortlisted for the World Car of the Year.

  • 2006 - Volkswagen Passat

European Car of the Year
Volkswagen have produced three winners of the European Car of the Year award.

  • 1992 - Volkswagen Golf
  • 2010 - Volkswagen Polo
  • 2013 - Volkswagen Golf

Volkswagen has had several models being shortlisted for the European Car of the Year.

  • 1971 - Volkswagen K70
  • 1975 - Volkswagen Golf
  • 1982 - Volkswagen Polo
  • 1984 - Volkswagen Golf
  • 1989 - Volkswagen Passat
  • 1995 - Volkswagen Polo
  • 1997 - Volkswagen Passat
  • 1998 - Volkswagen Golf
  • 2004 - Volkswagen Golf
  • 2006 - Volkswagen Passat
  • 2009 - Volkswagen Golf
  • 2012 - Volkswagen up!

Other awards
The Volkswagen Jetta TDI won the 2009 "Green Car of the Year" award from Green Car Journal. In 2011, Volkswagen had the most IIHS Top Safety Pick award vehicles of any automaker with 9 vehicles. The Volkswagen Passat NMS won the 2012 Motor Trend Car of the Year award. In 2012, the Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid set the world record to become the fastest hybrid car at 187 mph. In 2013, the Volkswagen XL1 became the most fuel-efficient production car in the world, with a combined fuel consumption of 261 mpg.

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