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Automobiles

New Suzuki Automobiles

Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
131 Kw (178 Hp)
Top speed
:
205 km/h
Carbody
:
Sedan
€ 34.999 €
0/0
Release Date
:
2015
Max power
:
131 Kw (178 Hp)
Top speed
:
215 km/h
Carbody
:
Sedan
€ 29.999 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
88 Kw (120 Hp)
Top speed
:
185 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 18.699 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
88 Kw (120 Hp)
Top speed
:
185 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 19.699 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
88 Kw (120 Hp)
Top speed
:
185 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 19.629 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
88 Kw (120 Hp
Top speed
:
185 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 21.999 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
88 Kw (120 Hp)
Top speed
:
185 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 25.299 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
88 Kw (120 Hp)
Top speed
:
185 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 20.510 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
88 Kw (120 Hp)
Top speed
:
185 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 21.665 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
88 Kw (120 Hp)
Top speed
:
185 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
$193,500
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
88 Kw (120 Hp)
Top speed
:
129 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 24.999 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
88 Kw (120 Hp)
Top speed
:
185 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 19.799 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
104 Kw (141 Hp)
Top speed
:
163 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 28.996 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
104 Kw (141 Hp)
Top speed
:
185 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 32.947 €
0/0
Release Date
:
Not Available
Max power
:
104 Kw (141 Hp)
Top speed
:
129 km/h
Carbody
:
Suv/offroad
€ 32.456 €
0/0
Release Date
:
2010
Max power
:
131 Kw (178 Hp)
Top speed
:
215 km/h
Carbody
:
Sedan
€ 29.999 €
0/0
Showing : 1 - 16 of total results 21
Suzuki GSX1300R
4
Displacement (cc)
:
1340 cc
Max power
:
197 Bhp @ 9500 rpm
Fuel Type
:
Petrol
Bike body
:
Naked
$14599 USD
0/0
Suzuki R1000
3
Displacement (cc)
:
999 cc
Max power
:
160 Bhp @ 9500 rpm
Fuel Type
:
Fuel Injection
Bike body
:
Semi-faired
$13899 USD
0/0
Suzuki 400 ABS
3
Displacement (cc)
:
400 cc
Max power
:
33.5 hp @ 7600 rpm
Fuel Type
:
Not Available
Bike body
:
Not Available
Suzuki Hayabusa
2
Displacement (cc)
:
1340cc
Max power
:
145.00kW @ 9500rpm (194.00hp)†
Fuel Type
:
Petrol
Bike body
:
Not Available
$14599 USD
0/0
Suzuki R1000 ABS
3
Displacement (cc)
:
999cc
Max power
:
136.10kW @ 12000rpm (182.50hp)†
Fuel Type
:
Petrol
Bike body
:
Not Available
$14999 CDN
0/0
Showing : 1 - 5 of total results 5

About Suzuki

Suzuki

History
In 1909, Michio Suzuki (1887–1982) founded the Suzuki Loom Works in the small seacoast village of Hamamatsu, Japan. Business boomed as Suzuki built weaving looms for Japan's giant silk industry. In 1929, Michio Suzuki invented a new type of weaving machine, which was exported overseas. Suzuki filed as many as 120 patents and utility model rights.[citation needed] The company's first 30 years focused on the development and production of these exceptionally complex machines.[citation needed]

Despite the success of his looms, it occurred to Suzuki that his company would benefit from diversification and he began to look at other products. Based on consumer demand, he decided that building a small car would be the most practical new venture. The project began in 1937, and within two years Suzuki had completed several compact prototype cars. These first Suzuki motor vehicles were powered by a then-innovative, liquid-cooled, four-stroke, four-cylinder engine. It had a cast aluminum crankcase and gearbox and generated 13 horsepower (9.7 kW) from a displacement of less than 800cc.

With the onset of World War II, production plans for Suzuki's new vehicles were halted when the government declared civilian passenger cars a "non-essential commodity." At the conclusion of the war, Suzuki went back to producing looms. Loom production was given a boost when the U.S. government approved the shipping of cotton to Japan. Suzuki's fortunes brightened as orders began to increase from domestic textile manufacturers. But the joy was short-lived as the cotton market collapsed in 1951.

Faced with this colossal challenge, Suzuki's thoughts went back to motor vehicles. After the war, the Japanese had a great need for affordable, reliable personal transportation. A number of firms began offering "clip-on" gas-powered engines that could be attached to the typical bicycle. Suzuki's first two-wheel ingenuity came in the form a bicycle fitted with a motor called, the "Power Free." Designed to be inexpensive and simple to build and maintain, the 1952 Power Free had a 36 cc, one horsepower, two-stroke engine. The unprecedented double-sprocket gear system enabled the rider to either pedal with the engine assisting, pedal without engine assist, or simply disconnect the pedals and run on engine power alone.[citation needed] The patent office of the new democratic government granted Suzuki a financial subsidy to continue research in motorcycle engineering, and so was born Suzuki Motor Corporation.

Leadership
The company was founded by Michio Suzuki;, its current Chairman and CEO is Osamu Suzuki, the fourth mukoyōshi in a row to run the company,

Timeline
The Suzuki Loom Company started in 1909 as a manufacturer of looms for weaving silk and cotton. Michio Suzuki was intent on making better, more user-friendly looms and, for 30 years his focus was on the development of these exceptionally complex machines. Michio's desire to diversify into automotive products was interrupted by World War II. Before it began building four-stroke engines, Suzuki Motor Corp. was known for its two-stroke engines (for motorcycles and autos).After the war, Suzuki made a two-stroke motorized bicycle, but eventually the company would be known for Hayabusa and GSX-R motorcycles, for the QuadRunner, and for dominating racetracks around the world. Even after producing its first car in 1955 the company didn't have an automobile division until 1961. Today Suzuki is among the world's largest automakers, and a major brand name in important markets, including Japan and India, but no longer sells cars in North America.

1909—1959

  • 1909: Michio Suzuki founds Suzuki Loom Works founded in Hamamatsu, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan.
  • 1920:, incorporated, and capitalized at 500,000 as Suzuki Loom Manufacturing Co. with Michio Suzuki as president.
  • 1937: Suzuki begins a project to diversify into manufacturing small cars. Within two years several innovative prototypes are completed, but the government declares civilian passenger cars a "non-essential commodity" at the onset of World War II, thwarting production plans.
  • 1940: Takatsuka Plant is built in Kami-mura, Hamana-gun, Shizuoka, Japan.
  • 1945: Plants close due to severe war damage. Company offices move to the Takatsuka Plant site.
  • 1947: Head office moves to the present address.
  • 1949: Company lists on the Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya Stock Exchanges.
  • 1950: Company has financial crisis due to labor difficulties.
  • 1952: "Power Free" motorized bicycle marketed.
  • 1953: Introduction of Diamond Free 60cc, 2-cycle motorized bicycle, displacement subsequently increases to 70cc.
  • 1954: Company name changed to Suzuki Motor Co., Ltd.
  • 1955: Introduction of Colleda COX 125cc 4-stroke single-cylinder, and Colleda ST 125cc, two-stroke single-cylinder motorcycles.
  • Suzulight (360cc, two-stroke) front wheel drive car introduced at the start of Japan's minivehicle age.
  • 1957: Michio Suzuki designated as adviser, and his son Shunzo Suzuki appointed as company president.
  • 1958: S mark adopted as corporate emblem.

1959: Launch of Colleda Sel Twin (2-cylinder) 125cc, two-stroke motorcycle with electric starter.
Introduction of all-new Suzulight TL 360cc light commercial, two-stroke minivehicle.
September 26, Typhoon Vera (Ise-Wan) destroys Suzuki's assembly plant.

2010—
2010: Aggregate sales of Suzuki cars in Japan reach 20 million units.
January: Volkswagen Group completes its purchase of 19.9% of Suzuki's outstanding shares.
Its plant in Yangon, Burma was closed after the joint venture with the government between 1998 and 2010 had expired.
2011: Suzuki announces Indonesia will become a regional production base with investment up to $800 million over the next few years.
February: Suzuki Manufacturing of America Corp. (SMAC) celebrates the 10th anniversary of its Rome, Georgia plant, and $1.4 billion sales in the past decade.
November: Suzuki terminates its partnership with VW in accordance with terms of the agreement, and commences arbitration proceedings for return of Suzuki shares held by the Volkswagen Group.

2012: Aggregate domestic sales in India by Maruti Suzuki reaches 10 million units. Aggregate domestic sales of minivehicles in Japan reaches 20 million units.

Subsidiaries
Maruti Suzuki India Limited
Based in Gurgaon, Harayana, Maruti Suzuki India Limited is an Indian automobile manufacturer that is a subsidiary of Japanese automaker Suzuki Motor Corporation. Maruti Suzuki produced 1,133,695 units between 1 April 2011 and 30 March 2012.The Suzuki Motor Corporation owns 54.2% of Maruti Suzuki and the rest is owned by various Indian public and financial institutions. The company was incorporated in 1981 and is listed on the Bombay Stock Exchange and National Stock Exchange of India.

Maruti Suzuki was born as a Government of India-led company named Maruti Udyog Limited, with Suzuki as a minor partner, to make lower priced cars for middle class Indians. Over the years, the product range has widened and ownership has changed hands as the customer has evolved.

Maruti Suzuki offers models ranging from the Maruti 800 to the premium sedan Maruti Suzuki Kizashi and luxury SUV Maruti Suzuki Grand Vitara. Maruti 800 was the first model launched by the company in 1983 followed by mini-van Maruti Omni in 1984. Maruti Gypsy, launched in 1985, came into widespread use with the Indian Army and Indian Police Service becoming its primary customers. The short-lived Maruti 1000 was replaced by Maruti Esteem in 1994.

Maruti Zen, launched in 1993, was the company's second compact car model. The company went on to launch another compact car Maruti Wagon-R followed by Maruti Baleno in 1999. It was later replaced by the Suzuki SX4.

Suzuki Canada Inc.

  • 1973 – 1 June, Suzuki Canada Ltd. was incorporated with offices at Downsview, Ontario. Product lines included motorcycles, parts and accessories to Suzuki dealers throughout Canada.
  • 1974 – Vancouver branch office and warehouse inaugurated to service dealers in western Canada.
  • 1980 – Autumn – Suzuki Canada began its automotive sales with the marketing and sales of four-wheel-LJ80 in eastern Canada. 1 November, the name of company changed from Suzuki Canada Ltd. to Suzuki Canada Inc.
  • 1982 – Introduction of a line of Suzuki all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) in Canada.
  • 1983 – Introduction of a line of Suzuki outboard motors in western Canada. 1 February 1983 – Western Branch moved to enlarged facilities in Richmond, British Columbia.
  • 1984 – Began the sales of 'Suzuki Forsa' (Suzuki Cultus) automobile.
  • 1986 – A $600 million Suzuki-GM joint venture CAMI Automotive Inc. announced for the manufacturing of vehicles. Production was set to begin in 1989 at Ingersoll, Ontario.
  • 1987 – 25 January – Suzuki Canada Inc. moved to a new 110,000 sq ft (10,000 m2). head office and warehouse facility at Richmond Hill, Ontario.
  • 1988 – Autumn – Suzuki began selling the CAMI-built 2-door Suzuki Sidekick.
  • 2009 – Autumn – Suzuki sold its participation in CAMI to GM[193]
  • In 2013, Suzuki Canada announced that it would follow the US division and stop selling automobiles in Canada after the 2014 model year. Suzuki Canada will continue to provide parts and services to vehicles through dealer network, as well as selling motorcycles, ATV and outboard motors.

Models

  • X6 Hustler twin (aka T20 Super Six) was sold from 1966 to 1968 as "the fastest 250cc motorcycle in the world." It had Suzuki's new Posi-Force automatic oil injection system (later called Suzuki CCI).Production peaked at more than 5000 units per month. In 2013, Suzuki renewed the Hustler motorcycle trademark for Europe, leading to rumors of a retro style 250 twin. A 1967 T20 Super Six was included in the Las Vegas show of The Art of the Motorcycle exhibition.
  • T500 Titan (aka T500 Cobra, GT500) had a 500 cc air-cooled parallel-twin engine which overcame problems with durability, overheating and vibration. With an output of 47 metric horsepower (35 kW) at 6,500 rpm and top speed of 180 kilometres per hour (110 mph), it became Suzuki's flagship machine in 1968, and remains popular with collectors and café racers.
  • GT750 Le Mans with a straight-three engine was the first Japanese motorcycle with a liquid-cooled engine, earning it the moniker "Water Buffalo." The Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan (Japanese) includes the 1971 Suzuki GT750 as one of their 240 Landmarks of Japanese Automotive Technology.
  • TM400 Cyclone production motocrosser was designed to participate in 500cc class Motocross World Championship racing. Introduced in 1971, it was notoriously difficult even for skilled riders to control. Redesigned in 1975.
  • The RM125 production motocrosser debuted in 1975 to replace the TM125. It was a successful forerunner of the future RM series line-up from 50cc to 500cc.
  • RM250 was fully redesigned in 1982 and the liquid-cooled single-cylinder delivered more power than any production 250cc motorcrosser of the time. It had Suzuki's original full floater, link-type rear suspension introduced a year earlier.
  • RG250 Gamma of 1983 was one of the new generation of race replica sport bikes of the 1980s. It had an aluminum frame, a full fairing and a high output straight-twin engine. The 1983 RG250Γ is one of the JSAE 240 Landmarks of Japanese Automotive Technology.

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